Kaspersky’s Antivirus For FREE Soon Rolling Out

July 27, 2017

I have known Kaspersky’s Antivirus to be one of the best when it comes to computer security (however, at a price — not FREE). Soon you will be able to get a baseline version of Kaspersky’s Antivirus for FREE. This new development by Kaspersky’s (according to ZDNet) is apparently in light of the U.S. Government removing Kaspersky Lab from two lists of approved vendors used by government agencies to purchase technology equipment. Apparently, this is amid concerns the Russian-based company’s products could be used by the Kremlin to gain entry into United States networks.

The removal of Kapersky’s from the vendors list follows the accusations from US intelligence agencies that Russia hacked into Democratic Party emails, thus helping Donald Trump to election victory, despite President Vladimir Putin proclaiming his country has never engaged in hacking activities, but some “patriotic” individuals may have.

Ok, now that you have digested this, is it safe to install the free version of Kaspersky’s on our home-based computer systems? Personally, I am not installing it and will stick to the free version of BitDefender; however, if you are interested in the FREE version, click on the source link below to monitor for its’ release. Reportedly, the free version will rollout to the U.S. first…

If you do opt to give this a try, make sure you remove (uninstall) any antivirus software that is currently existing on your computer. Typically, to remove antivirus software, it is best practices to visit the website of the product and look for an uninstaller that will completely and safely remove the antivirus software from your PC.

SOURCE: Kaspersky’s Antivirus FREE

 


Malwarebytes Labs Explain The “Dark Web” AKA: “Deep Web”

July 26, 2017

I encourage you visit the source link below to learn about the “Dark Web” (aka: Deep Web). Did you know that only 5% of the Web is easily accessible to the general public and that many other sites can only be visited if you have a direct URL. I often referred to the “Dark Web” here on the blog as the underbelly of the internet…

Before you go to read the article (which is very interesting), you need to learn some terminology:

  • Surface Web is what we would call the regular World Wide Web that is indexed and where websites are easy to find.
  • The Deep Web is the unindexed part of the Web. Actually, anything that a search engine can’t find.
  • The Dark Web is intentionally hidden, anonymous, and widely known for illicit activities.

Explained: the Dark Web

SOURCE: Malwarebytes Labs – Explained: the Dark Web


Many of the warning phrases you probably heard from your parents and teachers are also applicable to using computers and the Internet….

July 8, 2017

I am reblogging this information from US-CERT Security Tip (ST05-014) – Real-World Warnings Keep You Safe Online

U.S. Department of Homeland Security Seal. United States Computer Emergency Readiness Team US-CERT

Why are these warnings important?

Like the real world, technology and the Internet present dangers as well as benefits. Equipment fails, attackers may target you, and mistakes and poor judgment happen. Just as you take precautions to protect yourself in the real world, you need to take precautions to protect yourself online. For many users, computers and the Internet are unfamiliar and intimidating, so it is appropriate to approach them the same way we urge children to approach the real world.

What are some warnings to remember?

  • Don’t trust candy from strangers – Finding something on the Internet does not guarantee that it is true. Anyone can publish information online, so before accepting a statement as fact or taking action, verify that the source is reliable. It is also easy for attackers to “spoof” email addresses, so verify that an email is legitimate before opening an unexpected email attachment or responding to a request for personal information. (See Using Caution with Email Attachmentsand Avoiding Social Engineering and Phishing Attacks for more information.)
  • If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is – You have probably seen many emails promising fantastic rewards or monetary gifts. However, regardless of what the email claims, there are not any wealthy strangers desperate to send you money. Beware of grand promises—they are most likely spam, hoaxes, or phishing schemes. (See Reducing Spam and Identifying Hoaxes and Urban Legends.) Also be wary of pop-up windows and advertisements for free downloadable software—they may be disguising spyware. (See Recognizing and Avoiding Spyware.)
  • Don’t advertise that you are away from home – Some email accounts, especially within an organization, offer a feature (called an autoresponder) that allows you to create an “away” message if you are going to be away from your email for an extended period of time. The message is automatically sent to anyone who emails you while the autoresponder is enabled. While this is a helpful feature for letting your contacts know that you will not be able to respond right away, be careful how you phrase your message. You do not want to let potential attackers know that you are not home, or, worse, give specific details about your location and itinerary. Safer options include phrases such as “I will not have access to email between [date] and [date].” If possible, also restrict the recipients of the message to people within your organization or in your address book. If your away message replies to spam, it only confirms that your email account is active. This practice may increase the amount of spam you receive.
  • Lock up your valuables – If an attacker is able to access your personal data, he or she may be able to compromise or steal the information. Take steps to protect this information by following good security practices. (See the Tips index page for a list of relevant documents.) Some of the most basic precautions include locking your computer when you step away; using firewalls, anti-virus software, and strong passwords; installing appropriate software updates; and taking precautions when browsing or using email.
  • Have a backup plan – Since your information could be lost or compromised (due to an equipment malfunction, an error, or an attack), make regular backups of your information so that you still have clean, complete copies. (See Good Security Habits.) Backups also help you identify what has been changed or lost. If your computer has been infected, it is important to remove the infection before resuming your work. (See Recovering from Viruses, Worms, and Trojan Horses.) Keep in mind that if you did not realize that your computer was infected, your backups may also be compromised.

Geek Squeak #17-020: An Advanced Users’ Malware Killer

June 6, 2017

Curious if any of the folks out there with technical expertise have ever used RogueKiller? I typically go to Malwarebytes AntiMalware; however, I see RogueKiller has pretty darn good reviews.  The main point that jumps out at me is that RogueKiller is for advanced users (see video below)…

Roguekiller is a popular and an effective tool to remove some stubborn malware but be warned; you better know what you’re doing. While a lot of more well-known tools will only scan and delete for you, this tool will show you everything it finds that is a possible problem. You need to know what to remove and what not to remove, or you could delete something you want, or need. Your results may vary, but just use caution and do your homework before removing anything or ask someone who is computer savvy.

SOURCE: Major Geeks -RogueKiller 12.11.1.0


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These 7 Tips (from Kim Komando) Will Help You Master Facebook

May 27, 2017

I love Kim Komando’s tech column at USAToday and find her posted information very useful and on the same parallel to my blog when it comes to assisting home-based computer users.

Kim recently posted an article, “These 7 tips will help you master Facebook” that you should read, if you are an advocate of Facebook. In all honesty, I do not care for Facebook; however, I do care about the safety and security of people (which has been my lifelong profession as a law enforcement (and security) officer and computer info specialist).

The one tip that Kim posted in this article that jumps out at me, in regards to your safety and security, is the tip “Find out where you are logged in”… Many Facebook users (carelessly) log into multiple devices, often at multiple locations, and keep their Facebook pages open in order to “conveniently” access their account without having to log in. The upside to this is user convenience; however, the downside to this is you are setting yourself up to have your account compromised, which could result in devastating consequences.

To see if your account is open on other devices and locations, here is how (as Kim Komando pointed out) to determine that:

Just to go to Settings >> Security Settings >> Where You’re Logged In, and you’ll find a list of devices that are currently accessing your Facebook account. The feature also lists login metadata, such as when and where you last checked in, plus the type of device you used. Keep in mind that cell phones sometimes show weird locations, which may refer to a cell phone tower and not necessarily to where you were standing at the time.

Facebook

That said, if your login information looks a little fishy, it’s possible your account has been compromised. It’s best to lock down access before this even happens.

Kim Komando is a consumer tech columnist for USA TODAY. She also hosts the nation’s largest radio show about the digital lifestyle, heard on 435 stations in the USA and globally on American Forces Radio. Find your local radio station, get the podcast and more at Komando.com.

SOURCE: USAToday – Kim Komando


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Microsoft Patches MS-Word Exploit That Spreads Malware

April 12, 2017

On the same day Microsoft officially began rolling out the Creators Update for Windows 10, they were also rolling out a patch for a zero-day exploit (that spreads malware) for all current Microsoft Office versions used on every Windows operating system (including the latest Office 2016 running on Windows 10). If you are running Microsoft Office at home, make sure you have installed the patch. To learn more, click on the source link below…

All versions of Office on all versions of Windows are vulnerable to this zero-day that spreads malware, so make sure you patch quickly

Source: Microsoft patches Word zero-day booby-trap exploit – Naked Security


Was Informed That A New Version Of Malwarebytes Has Been Released

April 4, 2017

In discussion with a computer geek friend of mine he indicated that Malwarebytes has a new version out (v3.0). I further confirmed this and learned that a new version was released on and about March 20, 2017. Based on what I am reading on their blog (for this release) — CLICK HERE — the excitement over this release is that it is being touted as a next generation anti-virus replacement and will be called only Malwarebytes.

Once you download and install you will be entitled to a 14 day free trial. If you desire to revert to the FREE edition now and turn “off” the free trial, simply click on the “settings” (at the left side) and then click on “my accounts”, then turn off the trial under “subscription details”. If you decide to stick with the free edition, you will need to periodically perform the scans manually.

Malwarebytes is one of the first things I install on a new computer and is my “go to” tool when helping others eradicate malware and other exploits…

This product is built to provide comprehensive protection against today’s threat landscape so that you can finally replace your traditional antivirus.

Our engineers have spent the last year building this product from the ground up and have combined our Anti-Malware, Anti-Exploit, Anti-Ransomware, Website Protection, and Remediation technologies all into a single product which we simply call “Malwarebytes.” And it scans your computer 4 times faster!

mb3

With the combination of our Anti-Malware ($24.95), Anti-Exploit ($24.95) and Anti-Ransomware (free, beta) technologies, we will be selling Malwarebytes 3.0 at $39.99 per computer per year, 20% less than our previous products combined and 33% less than an average traditional antivirus. But don’t worry, if you are an existing customer with an active subscription or a lifetime license to Malwarebytes Anti-Malware, you will keep your existing price and get a free upgrade to Malwarebytes 3.0. If you have both an Anti-Malware and an Anti-Exploit subscription, we will upgrade you to a single subscription to Malwarebytes 3.0, reduce your subscription price and add more licenses to your subscription.

Source: Malwarebytes