Quick Tip: 3 Tips To Follow To Avoid Handheld Phone Use While Driving

Memorial Day weekend is here… Hooray! During this time many, many people will be on the road and many, many people will commit the ultimate driving sin; AND, that is using your handheld phone while driving.

It only takes that millisecond of distraction
that ultimately can change your life and the life of others; sometimes, forever…

Texting and phone use are the leading causes of distracted driving. The laws in many States prohibit the use of a handheld phone while driving. This includes the writing, sending or reading of a text or electronic message. Avoid a fine and park the phone before you drive.

Here are 3 tips to follow:

  • Pull over in a “safe” location if you need to call or text
  • Use your passenger as your designated texter and caller
  • Secure your phone in the trunk, glove box or back seat while you drive

All distractions endanger drivers, passengers and pedestrians. Most distractions involve cognitive and sensory distraction. When you make a call on a hand-held phone you are not only holding and looking at the phone, you are also dialing, listening and thinking about the conversation.

Driver distractions include:

Texting
Using a cell phone or smartphone
Eating and drinking
Talking to passengers
Grooming
Reading, including maps
Using a navigation system
Watching a video
Adjusting a radio, CD player, or MP3 player

Remember distractions are:

Visual – looking at something other than the road
Auditory – hearing something not related to driving
Manual – manipulating something other than the wheel
Cognitive – thinking about something other than driving

Quick Tip: How to “Pin To Taskbar” In Windows 10

I like to keep the desktop on my Windows 10 computer pretty much clear of any icons. Typically, if a program icon shows up on the desktop that I need to use frequently or get to quickly, I will pin it to the taskbar (the bar located at the bottom of the screen); then, once I know the program icon is on the taskbar, I will delete the program icon on the desktop.  I do this so that I can access the program from anywhere on the computer without having to go back to the desktop or go to the Start Menu. So, how do you pin a program icon (or folder, etc…) to the taskbar?

It is actually pretty basic. If you “right mouse click” the icon item, you will see an option to “Pin to taskbar”. Click on that option and the icon item will then be seen on the taskbar. To delete a pinned item on the taskbar, “right mouse click” the icon and click on “unpin from taskbar”. This same process will work on many program items that are on your Windows “Start Menu”, as well.

 

Quick Tip: Basic Steps For Setting Up A Wireless Router

I have found that you can follow the basic steps below when setting up and connecting a wireless router to the modem supplied by your internet service provider.

  1. Turn off the modem that was supplied by your internet service provider.
  2. Unplug the modem’s Ethernet cable from the back of your PC (This cable has a connection that is similar to a connection you would find on a landline phone, but slightly larger).
  3. Connect that cable to the WAN or internet port on your new wireless router,
  4. Power on your modem (wait for a minute or two),
  5. Next power on your router (wait for a minute or two),
  6. Now use another Ethernet cable to connect the PC to one of the LAN ports on the wireless router.
  7. Turn on your PC and you should be back online.
  8. To access the wireless router from your wireless devices, such as a laptop, smartphone, tablet, smart-home device, etc…, go into your wireless settings on the device and you should see the name of the wireless router that you just set up. At this point, you will have to enter the wireless password provided by the manufacturer in order to wirelessly access the router and get online.

Example: Back Side View of A Router

Image result for wireless router

I do encourage you to read the instruction manual for any deviations from the above steps and to learn how to change the admin password and how to change the wireless access password key (that you use to connect your wireless devices.).

If you are interested in purchasing a wireless router  CLICK HERE, to see Amazon’s Best Sellers.

How to clean a flat screen TV – Reviewed Televisions

Always use a microfiber cloth or towel—like the ones that come with a new pair of glasses—to clean your TV screen.

Repeat after me: I will never use Windex—or any type of window cleaner—to clean my TV.

Do Not Use Windex or Window Cleaner to Clean a TV Screen

Get the full details on “How to clean a flat screen TV” at the source link reflected below. The same techniques explained work for computer monitors, smartphones, tablets, etc…

Source: How to clean a flat screen TV – Reviewed Televisions

Quick Tip: The Power Of The “Right Mouse Click” Context Menu In Gmail

Gmail has become a very powerful web email application that has many features that we often fail to use. One such feature is the “right mouse click” context menu.

When Gmail is open, if you “right mouse click” on any email that is listed you will be presented with a context menu that is very powerful and will be of great benefit to you productivity-wise.

You can do such things, on the fly, such as:

  • Reply to, or forward, an email in one click from the main page
  • Archive, Delete, Mark as unread, Snooze emails
  • Move, Label or Mute emails
  • Search for all emails with the same subject (if conversation view is turned off)

You can also use this menu when selecting multiple emails at a time to perform batch operations. For example, you could select 5 emails, right mouse click and label them all the same; or move them all together into a specific folder…

Quick Tip: How To Create Web-Based Desktop Shortcuts In Google Chrome

If you were at my Windows 10 based desktop computer you would notice various icons on the desktop (and taskbar) for web-based applications such as my personal start page, my email, my calendar, my contacts, my notes, solitaire, etc… These are all shortcuts to the various web-based applications that I use frequently. For example, instead of opening of my Google Chrome browser, then going to the actual web page that hosts my email, I simply click on the shortcut and it will take me directly to the page. These shortcuts are easy to create and will improve your productivity immensely; also, shortcuts can be made to give the illusion they are like an installed software app on your PC.

So, how do you create a desktop shortcut in Google Chrome:

  • Open the Chrome web browser and go to the web page that you want to create the shortcut for.
  • Go to the Chrome menu, located in the upper right-hand corner of the browser and click on the three vertically aligned dots and a menu will open up.
  • Click on “Select More tools” and  then click on “Create shortcut”
  • The following type window will appear and if you notice there is an option to “Open as window”.

    By selecting this option, when the shortcut is created, the web page will open like a normal window that you typically see in Windows. If you do not select this option, the web page will open in Google Chrome as it normally does. In our case, for demo purposes, do not check that option (leave it blank).

  • Next, click on “Create” and voila’, your shortcut should now be on your Windows 10 desktop. By simply clicking on that shortcut, you will be taken directly to the web page that you created the shortcut for.

As an added option, in Windows 10, you can right click on the shortcut icon and select, “Pin to taskbar” and the shortcut will be created on the taskbar at the bottom of your desktop. Typically, I do this, then I delete the shortcut icon on the desktop. It is safe to delete these shortcuts at any time.

What is fun in working computers is trying different things. I encourage you to give this try and I think you will find that this is a great timesaver.

Quick Tip: How To Stop Facebook Videos From Auto Playing

Have you ever noticed when scrolling your Facebook timeline. and you come across a post that consists of a video; that the video will autoplay? This may seem like a real convenience; but, if you are like me, I find it a real nuisance.

To turn the video autoplay feature “off”, follow these steps:

  1. From the top right of Facebook, click on the “” (down arrow) and select Settings.
  2. Click Videos on the menu located at the left side of the screen.
  3. Click the dropdown menu next to Auto-Play Videos and select Off.

Quick Tip: How to block a Nuisance Gmail Sender

Getting a rampant amount of email from a specific sender in Gmail?  If so, simply block them. When you block the nuisance sender, their emails sent to you will land in your spam folder.

Follow the instructions below to block a sender in Gmail. You can use the same steps to unblock them, as well.

When you block a sender, messages they send will go to your Spam folder.

  1. On your computer, go to Gmail.
  2. Open the message.
  3. In the top right, click More More.
  4. Click Block [sender].

Quick Tip: How To Find, Lock Or Erase A Stolen or Lost Android Device

There is nothing more distressful than losing your smartphone… If you own an Android device, such as a smartphone, tablet or Chromebook, you most likely performed the initial set up using a Google Account (i.e. Gmail account). As a result, you have a feature where you can remotely find, lock or erase the device in the event the phone is stolen or lost (Note: The phone must be turned “on” in order for this to work). You can even ring the phone and send information to the phone requesting that the phone be returned. You will need to go to a computer, log into your Google account, in order to make this work. Follow the steps below to put you on the road of recovery. You can go ahead and practice this…

  1. Open a browser, like Chrome Chrome. If you’re using someone else’s device, use private browsing mode.
  2. Open your Google Account.
  3. In the “Security” section, select Find a lost or stolen phone.
  4. Select the lost phone, tablet, or Chromebook.
  5. Follow the step-by-step suggestions to help find and secure the device.

ADDED TIP: Also, did you know, if you have a Google Account, and you are logged in, you can perform a Google Search, type in “Find My Phone” and Google (with a map) will find your phone within about 50 feet.

Quick Tip: What is an UPS?

If you own a desktop computer, which is an investment or an appliance of value, you may want to invest in purchasing a UPS (uninterrupted power supply). An uninterruptible power supply (UPS), offers guaranteed power protection for connected electronics. When power is interrupted, or fluctuates outside safe levels, a UPS will instantly provide clean battery backup power and surge protection for plugged-in, sensitive equipment. Typically, during a power outage, the UPS will keep the equipment stable for a prescribed amount of runtime (depending on the type/model UPS you install). The time element gives you enough time to safely shut down the computer to prevent component damage and loss of data.  Many UPS will come with a bank of outlets. For example, I own the APC UPS Battery Backup & Surge Protector 650 which gives me a total of 8 outlets (4 on each side of the UPS). The important part to note here is that 4 of those outlets provide “battery back up & surge protection” and the other 4 provide on (surge protection).  I typically plug in the computer, monitor, router, and modem into the battery backup side and other less significant devices (such as a printer) in the other surge protection outlet. This particular UPS (APC UPS Battery Backup & Surge Protector 650) is rated for approximately a half hour of runtime during a complete outage.

APC UPS Battery Backup & Surge Protector 650

In the end, investing in one of these is like having an insurance policy that will help keep your computer and electronics running smoothly, even during those times when you have power fluctuations and outages.

Quick Tip: Did you know that the Google Chrome browser has a built-in task manager?

Google Chrome has a built-in task manager that will help you troubleshoot what tabs and extensions are causing issues. From the task manager, you can kill or end those processes that may assist you in troubleshooting what may be the culprit. Very, very seldom have I had to use the task manager, but is good to know it is there when things start slowing down.

You can quickly get to the task manager in Google Chrome by hitting the “Shift+Esc” keys together on your keyboard. You can also get to the task manager by accessing Chrome’s menu by clicking on the three dots at the top right corner of the browser, then “more tools”, then “task manager”.

Quick Tip: How To Power “Off” and Power “On” Your Android Phone

How do I turn the darn thing off and on?  Typically your Android Smartphone and other Android devices (like your tablet) are made to remain “on” and will go to sleep after a prescribed amount of time; however, it is a good idea (every so often) to turn the phone “off”, then back “on”. This is good to refresh the memory, dump any cached files, etc… Couple other situations where you may need to turn the phone “off” is a situation where you do not want the phone to cause a disturbance (like in Church, at a funeral, at a wedding, a meeting, etc…) OR you may need to turn it “off” when the phone has locked up.

On most Android devices if you do the following, you can turn the device (phone or tablet) “off”:

Press and hold in on the power button. Typically an option will appear that will allow you to select power “off” the device.

Samsung Power Off Restart

On most Android devices if you do the following, you can turn the device (phone or tablet) “on”:

Press and hold in on the power button. Be patient, it may take a bit of time for the boot screen to appear to indicate the device is powered “on”. Also, give the device a minute or more to fully boot up.

Quick Tip: Most Important Process You Can Learn In Windows is “Cut, Copy and Paste”

To this day, after over 30 years in computing, people still do not know how to “Cut, Copy and Paste”; and, I have found it to be one of the most difficult things to teach people. I consider it the most important process you can learn in order to master the computer that will increase your productivity immensely. I encourage you to learn how to “cut or copy and paste”; you will not regret it.

To explain how this works… In simple terms, when you select text, a graphic, or a file in whatever it is you are working in, you can cut or copy that text, graphic or file from one location to another, by using the paste command. Whatever it is you cut or copy will be saved to the area of the computer (that you do not visually see) called the Windows clipboard. When you go to use the paste command, it will take whatever it was you cut or copied (saved) to the clipboard and allow you to paste (insert) it at another location. When you copy something, it does just that, it makes an exact copy. When you cut something, it removes it from the location you are cutting from.

For example, I could highlight and select text in a document, right mouse click, select copy from the menu; then, go to another document I may be composing, right mouse click and select paste (and the text will be copied or pasted at that location). If you select the cut command, it would remove the text from the source document location, be copied to the clipboard where you can then paste it in the document you are composing. In file management, cut or copy and paste is very useful when moving files from folder to another.

Typically cut or copy and paste can be used from the “right mouse click menu” after you select the text, graphic or file you desire to use.

You can also can use the keyboard commands: Ctrl+X (cut); Ctrl+C (copy) and Ctrl+V (paste)…

As I mentioned, difficult to grasp, but learn how to do this and it will change how you use your computer forever and you will soon see it is actually very easy to master. If anything, learn how to “copy” and “paste” first until you get a good understanding of how this works; then, go to “cut” and “paste’. As an added note, “cut or copy and paste” are used on other operating platforms too, like your Android smartphone…

Quick Tip: How To Go Incognito In Google Chrome

I bet you did not know you could go “Incognito” in Google Chrome, where your browsing history and cookies are not stored, where your privacy is protected? Typically, when browsing the web your browser tracks you with cookies. Have you ever noticed when looking for a specific product that this product or products in similarity start popping up in the ads? If you were in “incognito mode” this would not occur. Chrome won’t save your browsing history, cookies and site data, or information entered in forms while in incognito mode. In other words, your “activity” is not tracked and stored.

How do you get to “incognito mode” in Google Chrome?

It is actually very simple. To open an incognito window in Chrome, click the three-dot icon on the top-right corner of the browser and select “New incognito window.” You can also get into “incognito mode” by using the keyboard shortcut of Ctrl+Shift+N (while Google Chrome is open).

Please know, that “incognito mode” does not hide the sites you visit from your place of employment, your internet service provider, etc… Even though your browsing history is private, on the computer that you are working from, your IP address can still be logged to indicate where you go and have been on the internet.

Quick Tip: Don’t Panic If Your Internet Service Is Disrupted; Be Prepared

Recently, during the evening hours, I lost my internet service connection. Our internet is provided by the local cable company and has been exceptionally dependable. Initial reboots/resets of my modem and router failed to recover the service. My gut instinct told me this was not a typical loss of service. Many folks in my neighborhood also lost their digital phone service, which caused panic to set in. I later learned the attack affected over 40 percent of their customer base (including businesses). After several days, the service was eventually restored. The culprit was a  “malicious and targeted attack from outside our network,” in a DDos attack (distributed denial of service) where the service was intentionally flooded with data sent simultaneously from many individual computers. I knew something to this effect was going on due that it got to a point I could reboot the equipment and regain service for a short period of time; then, it would drop out again.

Image result for ddos meaning

All in all, when done, and the service was restored, I learned some things:

DON’T PANIC… We live in a digital world that we are dependent on, where the source of service if attacked, can bring down the whole house, affecting many people and many types of internet-connected devices. BE PREPARED… Learn how to reboot your equipment.  Communicate with the neighbors or family to determine if they have service. A cell phone, in this case for many people, provided phone AND internet service. If you have a neighbor who has no cell phone, be the good neighbor. Follow the local news to see if it is widespread. Learn where (online) you can determine the status of the network you are connected to. In my case, I used my cell phone to get updates online from the cable company, instead of calling them on their overwhelmed customer service lines. I then passed this information on to my neighbors. When the service is restored, help each other to get the equipment back up and running. I ended up helping others reset their modems and testing to make sure they had their phone and internet service back; thus, saving them the expense of a service call (which may have taken days to get an onsite response).

In the end, I think what bothered me the most was seeing sneering comments online where people were complaining of the service going down. Having managed a computer network for a government agency, I had visions of IT people working (24/7) stressing out over this to bring back service; which, they eventually did. Also, this is concerning from the standpoint, and has to be questioned, “Is our country really prepared for these cyber attacks and is the proper funding being provided to provide the necessary defense measures?”.

Source: Antietam Broadband says all service back after widespread outage

 

 

 

Quick Tip: How To Find What Version Of Windows 10 Is On Your Computer

With Microsoft periodically sending out major Windows 10 updates (i.e. spring and fall) it is a good idea to learn how to find what version of Windows 10 is on your computer.

To do this:

  1. Right mouse click on the “Start Button” at the bottom left corner of your screen.
  2. On the menu that pops up, click on “System”
  3. When the “System” window appears, click on “About” (if it is not already showing).
  4. On the right side of this window, under “About”, scroll down and you will see “‘System Specifications” where you will find the version of Windows 10 you are running. For example, on my PC, I am running version 1809 of the Windows 10 Home Edition.  You will also find the install date and the OS build.

Quick Tip: How To Save A Gmail Message To Your Computer

The best way I have found to save a Gmail message to you computer (in its’ original format) is to do this:

In Gmail, open the message you desire to save to your computer.

At the top of the message (right side) you will see a printer icon. Click on that icon.

When the “Print” window pops up, click on the drop-down box next to “Destination” and select “Save to PDF”, then click on “Save”, and you will be prompted to save the result to your computer. The saved file will be in the “PDF” file format.

Note: There is also another option on the drop-down menu where you can also “Save to Google Drive” that is handy when you do not want to save the file to the computer that you are working on.

Quick Tip: Securing Your Android Phone

If you have ever lost or misplaced your Android phone there are two waves of panic that hit. Wave number one is just the fact of knowing you lost a valuable piece of property. Wave number two hits you when you realize everything you do on that phone (photos, personal data, passwords, social media, text messages, etc…) could be in the hands of someone else. Smartphones are a treasure trove of personal data that ultimately could compromise your life if you do not take the proper measures to secure your phone.

Image result for Securing Your Android Phone

Today’s tip is simply this… Secure your phone and do it now…

To do this (and each phone is slightly different), go into the “Settings” and look for a selection that will fall under the premise of “Security and Privacy”. In those “Security and Privacy” settings (and each phone is different) look for the options to secure your phone (via a lock screen). On today’s phones, depending on the model, you can protect access to the phone through passwords, swipe patterns, pin numbers, fingerprints, and face recognition. What do I use on my phone? I use face recognition, a pin number, and fingerprints in combo. What is the safest? I am going to say fingerprint; however, I am now reading that the crooks have ways to break that (one of the reasons I use a combination of access controls).

Anyhow, please lock down your phone before you experience the two waves of panic…

Quick Tip: How To Enable “Slide To Shutdown”

This is more a trick than a tip; but, once implemented, it is a quick way to shut down your Windows 10 computer.

Here’s how to do this:

Right-click on the desktop, and select  “New”, then select “Shortcut”. In the windows that pops up, paste the following line of code: %windir%\System32\SlideToShutDown.exe

THEN, select “Next”, THEN “Finish”… The shortcut will be created on your desktop. If you click on the shortcut a slide down of the screen will appear from the top. If you grab the slide down with the mouse pointer and pull down, the computer will shut down.

What I did on my PC was “right mouse click” on the shortcut I created, pinned it to the taskbar and then deleted the shortcut from the desktop. This makes it handy to perform the shutdown without having to go directly to the desktop.

 

Quick Tip: How To Delete Your Google Chrome Browsing Data On Your Computer

For you people at home that use Google Chrome as your browser, it is a good idea (from a security and privacy standpoint) to periodically clear your browsing data.

Clearing the browsing data is actually quite simple by following the steps below:

  1. Open “Google Chrome” on your computer
  2. Click on the three-dot icon on the top-right corner of the browser and select “More tools” > “Clear browsing data”. Note: You can also use the keyboard shortcut “Control-Shift-Delete” to proceed directly to the “Clear browsing data” window.
  3. When the “Clear browsing data” window pops up, you have the option of selecting (and deleting) the browsing history, cookies and other site data, and cached images and files. You also have the option of selecting the “Time Range” for the data you wish to remove. Typically, in my case, I check all three boxes and then select “All time” in the “Time Range; then, I click on “Clear data”.
  4. As an added note, when you are working in the “Clear browsing data” window you will also see an “Advanced” tab that provides options for additional items that can be deleted. I typically leave the “Advanced” tab options alone and go with the “Basic” options; however, that is a matter of preference.

Quick Tip (Android): Access ALL of YOUR Photos Wherever You Go

On your Android smartphone or tablet, look for “Google Photos”. With “Google Photos” you can back up any photos you take and see them online from any device at the “Google Photos” web site.  To make this an automated process, do the following:

  1. Open the “Google Photos” app on your device and tap on the (menu)…
  2. Tap on “Settings”
  3. Select “Backup & Sync”
  4. Toggle “Backup & Sync” to the “on” position. At this point on the selections under “Backup & Sync” you should see your Google (Gmail) account.
  5. Scroll down to “Upload Size” and select “High Quality” (free unlimited storage).

Note: Google will allow you to upload unlimited images providing you let Google convert the images to the “High Quality” setting. If you select “Original”, you will eat up your online space at Google.

Very easy; and will allow you to see your photos online. You can then, at your convenience, delete the photos on your phone when space becomes an issue.

Note: A Google account is required. Typically, you should already have a Google account when your Android phone was set up for your personal use.

Quick Tip: Right Mouse Click On The Windows 10 “Start Menu Button”

This one is for the folks at home and is something that I use all of the time. If you go to the bottom left corner of your screen and “right mouse click” on the Windows 10 Start Menu Button it will cause a menu to appear. This menu is a quick way to get into the various (commonly used) background settings and options in Windows. This also serves as a great way to explore and learn about these settings in a more user-friendly way.

 

Quick Tip: How To Define Words In A Google Search

When using Google to perform a search you can use what is called “qualifiers” (or common search techniques). One such qualifier that I often use is the word “define”. For example, let’s find the definition of the word “cognitive”.

Go to Google Search and type in the box the following:

define:cognitive

Then, hit “Enter” on your keyboard to get the result(s) or definition for “cognitive”.

If you notice there is no space between the qualifier “define” and “cognitive”. They are separated by a colon (:). You can also leave out the colon, but I have gotten into the habit of using the colon due that I use other qualifiers.

Here are examples of other qualifiers or common search techniques – click here.

Quick Tip: Should I Leave My Computer “ON” 24/7?

sleeping computer

Here at “What’s On My PC”, I typically fire up my PC in the morning, leave it “on” all day and then put it to bed (turn it “off”) at night. I like the idea of booting the computer when I get up to refresh it by clearing the memory, let the Window’s updates take, etc… I also don’t like the idea of leaving a computer on 24/7 because you just upped the risk of the computer being compromised by another person (such as a child) and or externally via the internet. I know at some places of employment, PC’s are left “on” 24/7.

Also, as an added note; if I leave my house for an extended period of time, I turn the computer “off”.

In summary, I look at a computer as an appliance that requires some level of supervision…

What is your take on this?

Quick Tip: How To Use The “Show Desktop Button” in Windows 10

Using the “Show Desktop” button to show the Windows desktop is one of those options in Windows, that is right before your eyes, that most people do not know exists.

If you move your mouse pointer to the very bottom right corner of your screen, to the taskbar, next to the time and date you should see a line or a sliver (actually called a button).

If you hold your mouse pointer on that button the desktop will appear. You can actually click on that button to go directly to the desktop. You can also toggle back and forth from the desktop and whatever application you are in by clicking on that button. This is handy when you need to get to the desktop to quickly launch another app, document, etc… I personally have found this to be quite useful.

If this button is not allowing you to peek at the desktop, it may be turned “off”. To turn it “on”, right mouse click on the “Windows Start Button”, click on “Settings”, then click on “Personalization”, then click on “Taskbar”. On the right side of the screen, you will see an option to toggle the desktop peek preview on and off.

Quick Tip: Disable/Uninstall Unneeded Android Apps

Typically, with few exceptions, when you purchase an Android smartphone (or tablet), there are apps on the phone that are pre-installed and cannot be uninstalled (or removed) if you do not need them. Since you cannot uninstall (or remove) these apps, I suggest that you disable them to prevent them from running in the background. To do this (each phone is slightly different), go into the main system settings of the phone and look for the app list or menu. In that menu locate the app you want to disable and look for the option to disable it.

For example, below is an image of the where I disabled the “Gallery” app on my phone. This will save me space on the phone and will save on background memory.

 

Quick Tip: Where is the “Caps Lock” key on my Chromebook?

When I first started using my Chromebook (Acer Chromebook 15), coming from using Windows all my life, the first mystery I encountered was; “Where is the Caps Lock Key?“. You know; the key you push down to toggle between lower and uppercase text.

Well, Google had to be different. Where the “Caps Lock” key typically is located (or labeled) on the keyboard (left side above the “Shift Key”),  you will notice there is a magnifying glass icon on the key. That key on the Chromebook is the “Search” key. On the newer Chromebooks this also can serve as the “Google Assistant” key that allows you to use Google Assistant. Typically, If you push the “Search” key on the Chromebook, the search option will pop up where you can search your device, apps and even the web (or Google Assistant will be activated, if you have the newer Chromebook). So, if that key is being used for search purposes, “Where is the Caps Lock Key?

Mystery Solved: In Google’s method to their madness strategy, the “Caps Locks” key is not a readily identifiable key; instead, you must use a keyboard shortcut. If you hold the “ALT” key + “SEARCH” key in combination, this serves the same purpose as the “Caps Lock” key (to change to uppercase text). When you do that you will see in the notification area (bottom right corner) a small notification popup alerting you that the “Caps Lock” is “on”. To toggle it “off” either hit the “ALT” key + “SEARCH” key” again OR simply hit the “SHIFT” key.  Also, as an added note, if you really do not like this at all, you can go into your Chromebook settings, look for “Keyboard” and you will see an option where you can change (or remap) what the “Search” key performs.

If you can overcome some of the keyboard quirks on the Chromebook you will come to find that these Chromebooks are great computers; especially, for folks at home, kids and our elders (which is the category I am now heading into : ) …

Chromebooks are becoming the choice computer in many of the schools due to their ease of maintenance, better security, and low cost — CLICK HERE — to see what is out there.

 

Quick Tip: Using The Windows Logo Key

Many folks at home are unaware of keyboard shortcuts. There are many shortcuts for many applications. Today, I want to tell you about the Windows Logo Key (for Windows 10) and provide a list of keyboard shortcuts that you can use in combination with the Windows Logo Key. If you press the Windows Logo Key, which is located on the bottom left side of the keyboard between the “CTRL” key and the “ALT” key, the “Start Menu” will open and close. If you press the “Windows Logo Key” in combination with other keys, as reflected on the list below, you can quickly open (and close) various components of Windows without having to navigate menus.

Continue reading “Quick Tip: Using The Windows Logo Key”

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